My Upcoming Talk at Brevard College, Sept. 20

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I am giving a lecture at Brevard College on September 20.  Come on out and hear about the origins of the botanical drug trade in southern Appalachia.  It is a story you won’t… Continue reading

Root Diggers and Herb Gatherers: The Rise and Decline of the Botanical Drug Industry in Southern Appalachia

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So I have polished off the old dissertation: “Root Diggers and Herb Gatherers: The Rise and Decline of the Botanical Drug Industry in Southern Appalachia.”  I’m sure the title does not do it… Continue reading

On the Fence: The Stock Law Revolt in Buncombe County, North Carolina, 1885-1887

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On the morning of June 8, 1885, one of the most unusual and contentious commission meetings in Buncombe County history was brought to order, one that would shape county politics for a decade… Continue reading

Tapping Into History With Maps: Maple Sugaring in Southern Appalachia

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This map tells a fascinating story: the rise and fall of the maple sugar industry.  Due to effective branding by the modern industry, most people associate maple sugar and maple syrup with Vermont,… Continue reading

The Shaker connection: How Appalachian plants helped create Big Pharma

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  In the fall of 1850, an enterprising young merchant named Calvin J. Cowles left his home outside of Wilkesboro, North Carolina, and headed north with his brother, Josiah, with a most unusual… Continue reading

The Lure of the Cheesecake Trout

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If you have caught a 12+ inch trout in Western North Carolina, chances are pretty good that it was raised at the NC Wildlife Resources Commission’s (WRC) Bobby N Setzer fish hatchery in… Continue reading

Galackin’ in Western North Carolina

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We could smell them before we saw them.  A pungent, skunky odor engulfed us as we neared the top of the ridge.  “Must be galax,” my brother Daniel remarked.  Sure enough, as we… Continue reading

The Ginseng Trade in 1840

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I’m kind of a map nerd, so sorry if this isn’t your cup of tea.  To show off my newly acquired–and very limited–skills using ArcGIS, here is one of the maps I have… Continue reading

Happy New Year and Welcome Back!

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I would like to apologize to our readers for being AWOL these past several months.  We’ve had some big changes that have taken our attention and energy.  Daniel got a job at the… Continue reading

Proctor, Cataloochee, and the Pursuit of Environmental History

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  By Luke Manget Getting to the abandoned town of Proctor requires some hiking nowadays.  You can either take the Lakeshore Trail some 15 miles from Fontana Dam into the remote southwestern corner… Continue reading

Appalachia’s Smartest Winter Wildlife

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By Daniel Manget All it takes is one January walk in the Appalachian woods to make one ask the question, “how on earth can wildlife live out here all the time?”  Most of… Continue reading

Do Mandrakes Scream? Exploring the cross-cultural work of plant mythology in Appalachia

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By Luke Manget In 1903, Clifford Smyth, a correspondent for the Atlanta Constitution, ventured deep into the mountains of eastern Kentucky to find and interview some of the “sang diggers” that supposedly lived… Continue reading

Making a Case for the Caddisfly

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  By Daniel Manget   The hermit crab outgrows its shell and finds a new one; but it doesn’t design and build it himself, it just finds a new one when once it’s… Continue reading

Do Panthers Scream?  Coming Face to Face with the Eastern Cougar Phenomenon

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By Luke Manget I remember well the noise that I heard that summer day in 2003 as I hiked down the Jacks River trail in north-central Georgia.  It sounded like a cat’s scream,… Continue reading

Root Diggers and Herb Gatherers: How Wild Plants shaped post-Civil War Appalachian Society

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The Riddle of the Remaining Leaves

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By Daniel Manget   As the excitement and energy of spring starts creeping up the mountain, we say goodbye to winter with its dull hues, long shadows, and distant leafless views that makes one… Continue reading

Revealing Fall’s True Colors

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By Daniel Manget It is that time of year again.  Time to prepare for the “big sleep” of winter, as with nature, and reflect upon all that has happened throughout the long eventful… Continue reading

Parasitic Flowering Plants of Appalachia

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By Daniel Manget     In late summer in the Southern Appalachians, the plants get so thick that traveling through the woods on anything other than a trail is almost out of the… Continue reading

David Greer, Hermit of Bald Mountain: A Romantic Alternative to the “Wild Man” Myth

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By Luke Manget Last week I wrote about how popular perceptions of the “wild man of the woods” in the late nineteenth century led to something of a round-up of human forest dwellers… Continue reading

The “Wild Man” of the Woods

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By Luke Manget In 1877, a party of gold miners traveling through the Globe Valley in Caldwell County, North Carolina encountered what they described as a “Wild Man”. Although they only got within… Continue reading

Death of a Sang Digger and the Fate of the Commons

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By Luke Manget   On July 28, 1908, a Mrs. Collins appeared at the Lee County, VA, courthouse with a shocking and peculiar letter. The letter relayed third-hand news that her husband had… Continue reading

Eft Up! The Magnetic life of the Red-Spotted Newt

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By Daniel Manget It’s the most common Salamander in North America but the only Newt east of the Mississippi.  It has to be one of the most charismatic and intriguing creatures in North… Continue reading

Lobelia, the herb that carried more cultural weight than marijuana.

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Before there was marijuana, there was lobelia. This blue, summer wildflower was the most controversial plant in the United States prior to the Civil War, as it came to symbolize a cultural divide… Continue reading

In the Footsteps of Herb Diggers

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By Luke Manget   Rarely do I get the opportunity to do field work as a historian. Most of my hours are spent in front of a book or a computer, but last… Continue reading

The Solar-Powered Salamander

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By Daniel Manget Yes, it’s as crazy as it sounds, a solar-powered Salamander, but not from solar panels but from Algae.  Green Algae and the Spotted Salamander Ambystoma maculatum have been known to have a… Continue reading